Gorgons, Perseus, and Raven Winged Boots

I was recently asked if I would make a print of my watercolor painting ‘Let’s Just Say Perseus Won’t be Needing His Boots Anymore.’ Thanks to my client’s interest, and after a lot of research and trying several different printers, the print is now available as a Limited Edition Giclee on my website here. It is also available framed in a 12 x 16 white wood frame, matted, with plexiglass. 

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Let's Just Say Perseus Won't be Needing His Boots Anymore

 

I sent the client the story behind the painting which is as follows:

Let's Just Say Perseus Won't be Needing His Boots Anymore refers to the golden winged sandals that Perseus acquired in order to bring the head of Medusa (poor Gorgon) to Athena. My imagination was ignited by reading Edith Hamilton's "Mythology: Timeless Tales of Gods and Heroes" as a girl. It wasn't until I got older, that it occurred to me, to question why the men got to have all the fun (have winged footwear – not murder Gorgons.)

The boots in this painting are a pair I couldn't resist once I spotted them in a shop window in SoHo, minus the raven wings of course! It's all about the boots - the ones that make you feel like you could take on anything, even ascend among the clouds. 

After receiving the story my client was curious what the boots depicted in the painting looked like in “real-life”, so I sent her pictures (above). My favorite part of these boots is the pistachio lining, which no one but me gets to see, it’s a little secret! My client shared a picture of her own fabulous boots, complete with wings (below)! 

Do you have a pair of boots or shoes that make you feel fierce and fabulous when you wear them? Please share, I’d love to see them!

Coincidently, The Met is having an exhibition called Dangerous Beauty: Medusa in Classical Art exploring themes of women’s power and subsequent demonization. There is an interesting bit with pictures on it here.

 Terracotta two-handled funnel vase with Medusa head (Greek, South Italian, Apulian, Canosan, Early Hellenistic, late 4th–early 3rd century BCE), terracotta, height: 30 3/4 inches; diameter: 17 5/16 inches (courtesy the Metropolitan Museum of Art, Rogers Fund, 1906) (Image from  Hyperallergic article )

Terracotta two-handled funnel vase with Medusa head (Greek, South Italian, Apulian, Canosan, Early Hellenistic, late 4th–early 3rd century BCE), terracotta, height: 30 3/4 inches; diameter: 17 5/16 inches (courtesy the Metropolitan Museum of Art, Rogers Fund, 1906) (Image from Hyperallergic article)